DIY Carpentry: Skil Table Saw

DIY Carpentry: Skil Table Saw
SKIL Table Saw Worktable

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The Table Saw

I somehow managed to complete several DIY home projects without a table saw, but after I finally purchased my own, I don’t know how I ever survived the DIY carpentry world without it.  After I purchased my table saw, I decided to build a work table that the saw is integrated into.  I also added castors to my work table so I can move it out into the driveway or move it around the garage.  The featured image in this post has a picture of my DIY work table with the integrated SKIL table saw.  As you can see from the photo, the SKIL table saw fits nicely into my work table.  I can’t even begin to tell you the mileage I have gotten out of this combination.

Why Did I Choose SKIL?

I read several reviews on all of the different table saws that are meant for the average DIY homeowner.  It all came down to a personal experience I had with a friend who is also a DIY carpenter.  He had the same saw that I would one day purchase.  His saw is mounted on a custom frame, but not a full-sized worktable like mine.  He built a frame for his and put castors on it so he could roll it around.  The bottom of the frame is shaped like a funnel which captures the majority of the saw dust.  For those of you who don’t know, table saws generally throw all of their saw dust out of the bottom of the saw.  Besides my personal experiences using the saw before owning it, the overall quality of it is incredible.  The increments on the fence are also extremely accurate which is very important, especially when you are cutting expensive materials.  My twist on his saw dust capture device was this:  I cut a round hole in the shelf that my saw is mounted to that is sized to fit a 5-gallon bucket from one of the ‘big box’ stores.  I cut a hole in the bottom of the bucket and attached my shop vacuum to it.  When I run my saw, I also run my shop vac which means that my table saw makes almost no mess.  It’s great when I have to make a cut inside of my garage whenever the weather isn’t cooperating with my weekend DIY plans.  You can see my shop vac in the picture, but the bucket is slightly out of view.

It’s Time To Move On

If you’re like me, you’ve owned a circular saw for eons (mine was passed down to my by my grandfather).  I have no regrets about purchasing my SKIL table saw and the accompanying shop vac.  If you have specific questions about these items, please post them in the comment section below.

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Regards,

RCD

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